Sandhya Suri skillfully weaves together archival footage – including hand-colored sequences – with a new score by Soumik Datta to create an emotionally resonant story about life across India from 1899 to 1947.

Drawn exclusively from the BFI National Archive, AROUND INDIA WITH A MOVIE CAMERA features some of the earliest surviving film from India as well as gorgeous travelogues, intimate home movies, and newsreels from British, French and Indian filmmakers. Taking in Maharajas and Viceroys, fakirs and farmhands and personalities like Sabu and Gandhi, the film explores not only the people and places of over 70 years ago, but asks us to engage with broader themes of a shared history, shifting perspectives in the lead up to Indian independence and the ghosts of the past.

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BONUS FEATURES:
Includes three bonus films:HOME LIFE (31 minutes, silent) 
INDIAN SCRAPBOOK (11 minutes)
SCENES AT HIS EXCELLENCY THE VICEROY’S GARDEN PARTY AT THE BELVEDERE (6 minutes, silent)    

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Ever since I watched Takeshi Kitano's "Hana-Bi" for the first time (and many times after that) I have been a cinephile. While much can be said about the technical aspects of film, coming from a small town in Germany, I cherish the notion of art showing its audience something which one does normally avoid, neglect or is unable to see for many different reasons. Often the stories told in films have helped me understand, discover and connect to something new which is a concept I would like to convey in the way I talk and write about films. Thus, I try to include some info on the background of each film as well as a short analysis (without spoilers, of course), an approach which should reflect the context of a work of art no matter what genre, director or cast. In the end, I hope to pass on my joy of watching film and talking about it.